What is Python all() function and how it works for beginners?

In this post, we’ll learn about Python all() function and how it works for beginners with real-life examples to make learning easier.

Table of Contents

Introduction

Python all() function returns true if the object is iterable. It takes iterable as a single argument and returns a boolean value.

Syntax

all(iterable)

Examples

Checking what the all() the function returns when used with list, tuples, sets, and dictionaries.

# on list
mylist = [1,2,3]
x = all(mylist)
print("On list {}\n".format(x))

# on empty list
mylist = []
x = all(mylist)
print("On empty list {}\n".format(x))

# on tuples 
myTuple = ("this", "is", "tuple")
x = all(myTuple)
print("On empty list {}\n".format(x))

# on empty tuples
myTuple = ()
x = all(myTuple)
print("On empty list {}\n".format(x))

# on sets
mySet = {"this", "is", "sets"}
x = all(mySet)
print("On empty set {}\n".format(x))

# on empty sets
mySet = {}
x = all(mySet)
print("On empty set {}\n".format(x))

# on dictionary
myDict = {"name" : "james", "age" : 12}
x = all(myDict)
print("On Dictionary {}\n".format(x))

# on empty dictionary
myDict = {}
x = all(myDict)
print("On empty Dictionary {}\n".format(x))

# PYTHON OUTPUT
On list : True

On empty list : True

On Tuple : True

On empty Tuple : True

On set : True

On empty set : True

On Dictionary : True

On empty Dictionary : True

The all() function also works on strings.

myStr = "Welcome to Python"
x = all(myStr)
print("On String {}\n".format(x))

# on empty string
myStr = ""
x = all(myStr)
print("On empty String {}\n".format(x))

# PYTHON OUTPUT
On String True

On empty String True

On range() function.

x = all(range(0,6))
print("On range function 1 : {}\n".format(x))

x = all(range(1,6))
print("On range function 2 : {}\n".format(x))

# PYTHON OUTPUT
On range function 1 : False

On range function 2 : True

You can see that for range(0,6) the all() function returns False and for range(1,6) returns True
Let us look at another example using a list, tuples, etc.

On iterable objects with the item as False or numeric zero number.

# on list
mylist = [0,1,False]
x = all(mylist)
print("On list : {}\n".format(x))

# on tuples 
myTuple = (0, False)
x = all(myTuple)
print("On Tuple : {}\n".format(x))

# on sets
mySet = {0, False}
x = all(mySet)
print("On set : {}\n".format(x))

# on dictionary
myDict = {0 : "james", 0 : 12}
x = all(myDict)
print("On Dictionary : {}\n".format(x))

# on string
myStr = "0"
x = all(myStr)
print("On String {}\n".format(x))

# PYTHON OUTPUT
On list : False

On Tuple : False

On set : False

On Dictionary : False

On String True

So by these examples, we come to know that all() function result may change if one of its items is 0 or False.
If items are not zero nor False than it returns True and for zero as a string, it returns True.

For official documentation visit Python org.

Conclusion

You can reach at the end of our post on Python all() function and how it works?. we appreciate you for going through this post.
If you find anything difficult with our way of explanation please leave us a comment and if you have enjoyed reading our post then help
us grow by sharing this post link.

Related Posts

Summary
Review Date
Reviewed Item
What is Python all() function and how it works?
Author Rating
51star
1star1star1star1star
Software Name
Python Programming Language
Software Name
Windows Os, Mac Os, Ubuntu Os
Software Category
Programming Langauage